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Thread: Hey Bob

  1. #1
    Guest

    Default Hey Bob

    A very easy first step for cleaning your carb(s) and maybe solving your low RPM stumble is to pick up a can of SeaFoam and pour some in your fuel tank. Alot of folks do this monthly to keep things clean, and the stuff works really well. It's a red and white can available at any auto parts store. It indicates on the can how much to use per how many gallons of fuel.

    I would not use it if the inside of your gas tank is dirty and/or rusty. The SeaFoam will break down that dirt and could make the carb(s) worse.

    This is all based on your previous owner putting in the correct jets when he installed the exhaust. The jets screw into the carb body internally, have a diameter size like a pencil with a very small hole drilled in the center. The size of the hole varies with the size of the jet. And when I say small I mean like a single wire brush bristle small for cleaning. So it doesn't take much dirt at all to clog one.

    Some carbs and engines the jets can be removed while the carb is still on the bike, your's I don't know about-I'm not familiar with it.

    Or you could pull the carb(s) and open it for a thorough inspection and cleaning. Takes more time and effort but then you know exactly what you're dealing with.

    If you do decide to pull it, find out what jets should be used on your bike, with the pipes you have, so once you're inside you'll know if the correct one have been installed. The jet sizes are stamped in the sides of the jet for identification.

    You can pull your spark plugs for a quick look at how the engine is doing. Black/wet means it's rich-white means hot/lean-tan/light brown is "normal".

    If you decide to do any of it, and would like a hand, gimme a shout. I'd be happy to help you out, and I'm close.*

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    3,265

    Default Re: Hey Bob

    Quote Originally Posted by The Joker
    A very easy first step for cleaning your carb(s) and maybe solving your low RPM stumble is to pick up a can of SeaFoam and pour some in your fuel tank. Alot of folks do this monthly to keep things clean, and the stuff works really well. It's a red and white can available at any auto parts store. It indicates on the can how much to use per how many gallons of fuel.

    I would not use it if the inside of your gas tank is dirty and/or rusty. The SeaFoam will break down that dirt and could make the carb(s) worse.

    This is all based on your previous owner putting in the correct jets when he installed the exhaust. The jets screw into the carb body internally, have a diameter size like a pencil with a very small hole drilled in the center. The size of the hole varies with the size of the jet. And when I say small I mean like a single wire brush bristle small for cleaning. So it doesn't take much dirt at all to clog one.

    Some carbs and engines the jets can be removed while the carb is still on the bike, your's I don't know about-I'm not familiar with it.

    Or you could pull the carb(s) and open it for a thorough inspection and cleaning. Takes more time and effort but then you know exactly what you're dealing with.

    If you do decide to pull it, find out what jets should be used on your bike, with the pipes you have, so once you're inside you'll know if the correct one have been installed. The jet sizes are stamped in the sides of the jet for identification.

    You can pull your spark plugs for a quick look at how the engine is doing. Black/wet means it's rich-white means hot/lean-tan/light brown is "normal".

    If you decide to do any of it, and would like a hand, gimme a shout. I'd be happy to help you out, and I'm close.*
    Thanks!* I actually put some SeaFoam in the day I got it and filled it up.

    The plugs where a little wet and I threw in some new ones.* How do I know what jets I need with the exhaust I used?

    Thanks!
    Money won is twice as sweet as money earned.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    3,265

    Default Re: Hey Bob

    http://www.dynojet.com/pdf/2186.pdf

    This is what Hard Krome says to use.* The guy I bought it from says he had it jetted but maybe he used too big of a jet kit?* I might pull it apart and see this weekend if it will be an easy job.
    Money won is twice as sweet as money earned.

  4. #4
    Guest

    Default Re: Hey Bob

    The pipes manufacturer can tell what jets to use, and it looks like you have that covered.

  5. #5
    Guest

    Default Re: Hey Bob

    Here's some exploded art of your carb-

    http://img383.imageshack.us/my.php?imag ... torms8.gif[/img]

    See the 4 small parts just under the carb's main body? Item number 92063/A-G is the main jet, above it the jet needle. There's an low/idle jet too. I don't know how your carb looks on your bike, but it doesn't look like it can be inspected or changed while on the bike, but I don't know for sure.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    3,265

    Default Re: Hey Bob

    I ordered the jet kit but am going to send it back.* LOL* I started to take the tank off and everything last night to get it ready for the jet kit but it looks like the carb has been off before so it probably does have the kit in it.* I ended up running spraying SeaFoam right into the carb and running it through the vacuum lines.* It runs sooooooooo much smoother now.
    Money won is twice as sweet as money earned.

  7. #7
    Guest

    Default Re: Hey Bob

    Another handy way is to turn off the tank valve and drain the carb(s). Then open the drain all the way and fill it in that way.

    Anyway, glad you got it worked out. The jets are very small so it doesn't take make dirt to get them plugged/clogged.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    3,265

    Default Re: Hey Bob

    I think it's the K&N filter that is on the bike.* I had similar issues on my old truck that I ran a K&N on.* The oil gummed up a bunch of stuff.
    Money won is twice as sweet as money earned.

  9. #9
    Guest

    Default Re: Hey Bob

    Yeah, that happens too. I've seen that on a variety of vehicles. :

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