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BLUESMAN
09-24-2012, 01:09 AM
Had a sick deer yesterday walk head on into our east line fence, it couldn't jump over or back up, it just stood there like a zombe, the o/l called the county and they came over and put it down, the cop said that was the 5th one he had done yesterday :wtf:I don't think I will harvest any to eat this season, but thats just me, what does everyone else think?

http://i549.photobucket.com/albums/ii369/oldmanhonda/DSC01595640x4802.jpg

Nobody
09-24-2012, 05:30 AM
Might have been bovine TB. I know that was/is and issue from a few years back.

Gas Man
09-24-2012, 08:43 AM
WOW, yeah that is scary...

RedneckMedic
09-24-2012, 10:57 AM
It could have just been weak and sick in general. Tb is very rare and bovine wasting disease is even more rare. You can harvest all you want. You will know if it has either once you get up to your kill. I processed about 500 dear a year for 6 years and we never jad either come in and never heard of any hunters coming across any. They are tasty so shoot away my friend.

Mudpuppy
09-24-2012, 11:11 AM
dude it is totally chronic wasting disease. big time problem right now. 2 issues right now both based on overpopulation of deer:

1. Mild winter lead to big time breeding by the deer
2. Drought this summer has lead to not a lot of food for the deer

So the deer are undernourished and on the move to find food. So the deer - car - bike - truck accidents will be way up this year. I have probably already seen about 500 deer in areas where typically I might see about 10-30. They are way overpopulated. Stack em and whack em. TB is way down but could go back up based on the conditions. TB is easy to check for - white spots on the lungs. All the deer I see this year you can see their ribs and they are way undernourished.

http://www.michigan.gov/dnr/0,4570,7-153-10370_12150_24910---,00.html

Chain
09-24-2012, 11:55 AM
http://www.michigan.gov/dnr/0,4570,7-153--283540--RSS,00.html

Actually its probably EHD... We've found quite a few. A buddy of mine found 13 dead just the other day, 6 bucks! Nice ones too. Our property is only 4 miles from his, but we've only found 1 fawn dead. I guess this causes them to get super delirious.

junkyardjon
09-24-2012, 09:10 PM
i blame bill gates..... ahahahahahahahahahaha just kidding

maybe the zomie stories are true and it's time to start blasting, people included.

BLUESMAN
09-25-2012, 12:29 AM
yes it is EHD land owners have found over 1600 dead deer here in ionia county alone, that number is going up everyday, a bunch of us got together at hill top sport shop, we are thinking of keeping our guns and bows on the wall for a season to try and let them get the deer pop, up again, this pass weekend a farmer 1/2 mile from me found 14 dead laying around a swamp on his land, the deer try and get to water because they are burning up from the inside out, they last about two days, then just lay down and die,, all from a fly bite,, the sooner we get some frost the sooner it will be over

Chain
09-25-2012, 08:36 AM
Bluesman, were just across the northern boarder of Ionia county, and we've had two frosts, one last week, and yesterday morning.... so it should be done soon. We haven't found much ourselves, but we have friends that have prop in Ionia c, and theyre hanging up there shit for the season. If you drive thru Ionia, you can smell death! It's disgusting!

RedneckMedic
09-25-2012, 08:46 AM
Ya cwd is comparable to mad cow and effects the brain in a different way than ehd. I did a 10 page report on cwd for bio and really grossed my class out when I brought in a healthy dear brain for show and tell.

BLUESMAN
09-26-2012, 01:34 AM
Yeah I know what you mean about the smell,, and what's a shame the coyotes and fox won't even eat them

Mudpuppy
09-26-2012, 10:32 AM
yep probably EHD - CWD is more rare. Just got this from the DNR:

DNR announces EHD now found in 24 counties

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Michigan State University Diagnostic Center for Population and Animal Health announced that epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) has been confirmed in 24 Michigan counties. For a list of all 24 counties, visit www.michigan.gov/emergingdiseases (http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTIwOTI0LjEwNzE2MTMxJ m1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDEyMDkyNC4xMDcxNjE zMSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3MTcyMTM0JmVtY WlsaWQ9cGdyYW5vd2ljekBnbWFpbC5jb20mdXNlcmlkPXBncmF ub3dpY3pAZ21haWwuY29tJmZsPSZleHRyYT1NdWx0aXZhcmlhd GVJZD0mJiY=&&&106&&&http://www.michigan.gov/emergingdiseases?source=govdelivery) and click on EHD, which is located near the bottom of the page.

The disease is caused by a virus that is transmitted by a type of biting fly. A constant characteristic of EHD is its sudden onset. Deer can suffer extensive internal bleeding, lose their appetite and fear of humans, grow progressively weaker, salivate excessively and finally become unconscious. Due to a high fever, infected deer often are found sick or dead along or in bodies of water.

At present, just over 4,200 dead deer have been reported in 24 counties. The DNR expects more dead deer to be found as farmers harvest their crops and hunters take to the field.

“Since July, the DNR, in cooperation with many, helpful volunteers, has been monitoring the EHD outbreak,” said Brent Rudolph, DNR deer and elk program leader. “This is a horrible disease for hunters, DNR personnel and other wildlife enthusiasts to see affecting deer.”

Rudolph explained that the first, hard frost should kill the flies. These insects have thrived this year due to the dry, hot summer. This year has seen a number of major outbreaks across the country, and EHD has been documented in all neighboring states of Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana and Ohio.

The DNR has received numerous calls from hunters who have asked if deer seasons will be closed this year. They will not be closed; the deer seasons will go as planned this year.

Other callers have voiced concern with harvesting an EHD-infected deer. They have asked if deer infected with EHD are safe to eat. EHD does not affect humans, so edibility of the venison is not affected by this disease. There is no evidence that humans can contract the EHD virus either from the midge or from handling and eating venison.

Hunters in affected townships should anticipate seeing fewer deer this year. However, because EHD die-offs are localized, hunters in adjoining townships may not notice any differences. States that have had similar pronounced outbreaks in the past have consistently seen deer numbers in such localized areas rebound within a few years.

“We will continue to monitor this unfortunate situation,” said Russ Mason, DNR Wildlife Division chief. “I understand how important the deer resource is to people. EHD is affecting me and my family as well because we are deer hunters. When we consider regulations for next year, there is no doubt that we will be factoring in the impact of this disease along with other influences on the deer population. Most likely, there will be changes to our management of deer in southern Michigan.”

The DNR encourages hunters to stay aware of confirmed outbreak areas and adjust, if appropriate, their hunt and harvest plans.

Anyone discovering concentrations of dead deer or those seeking more information can contact their local wildlife biologist at the nearest DNR office. Office locations can be found at www.michigan.gov/wildlife (http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTIwOTI0LjEwNzE2MTMxJ m1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDEyMDkyNC4xMDcxNjE zMSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3MTcyMTM0JmVtY WlsaWQ9cGdyYW5vd2ljekBnbWFpbC5jb20mdXNlcmlkPXBncmF ub3dpY3pAZ21haWwuY29tJmZsPSZleHRyYT1NdWx0aXZhcmlhd GVJZD0mJiY=&&&107&&&http://www.michigan.gov/wildlife?source=govdelivery) under Wildlife Offices.

Because dead deer do not harbor EHD and cannot infect other deer, it’s fine to leave carcasses where they are found. It’s also fine to bury dead deer at a sufficient depth so that no parts are showing above ground. Finally, carcasses will be accepted at landfills that accept household solid waste.DNR announces EHD now found in 24 counties

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Michigan State University Diagnostic Center for Population and Animal Health announced that epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) has been confirmed in 24 Michigan counties. For a list of all 24 counties, visit www.michigan.gov/emergingdiseases (http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTIwOTI0LjEwNzE2MTMxJ m1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDEyMDkyNC4xMDcxNjE zMSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3MTcyMTM0JmVtY WlsaWQ9cGdyYW5vd2ljekBnbWFpbC5jb20mdXNlcmlkPXBncmF ub3dpY3pAZ21haWwuY29tJmZsPSZleHRyYT1NdWx0aXZhcmlhd GVJZD0mJiY=&&&106&&&http://www.michigan.gov/emergingdiseases?source=govdelivery) and click on EHD, which is located near the bottom of the page.

The disease is caused by a virus that is transmitted by a type of biting fly. A constant characteristic of EHD is its sudden onset. Deer can suffer extensive internal bleeding, lose their appetite and fear of humans, grow progressively weaker, salivate excessively and finally become unconscious. Due to a high fever, infected deer often are found sick or dead along or in bodies of water.

At present, just over 4,200 dead deer have been reported in 24 counties. The DNR expects more dead deer to be found as farmers harvest their crops and hunters take to the field.

“Since July, the DNR, in cooperation with many, helpful volunteers, has been monitoring the EHD outbreak,” said Brent Rudolph, DNR deer and elk program leader. “This is a horrible disease for hunters, DNR personnel and other wildlife enthusiasts to see affecting deer.”

Rudolph explained that the first, hard frost should kill the flies. These insects have thrived this year due to the dry, hot summer. This year has seen a number of major outbreaks across the country, and EHD has been documented in all neighboring states of Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana and Ohio.

The DNR has received numerous calls from hunters who have asked if deer seasons will be closed this year. They will not be closed; the deer seasons will go as planned this year.

Other callers have voiced concern with harvesting an EHD-infected deer. They have asked if deer infected with EHD are safe to eat. EHD does not affect humans, so edibility of the venison is not affected by this disease. There is no evidence that humans can contract the EHD virus either from the midge or from handling and eating venison.

Hunters in affected townships should anticipate seeing fewer deer this year. However, because EHD die-offs are localized, hunters in adjoining townships may not notice any differences. States that have had similar pronounced outbreaks in the past have consistently seen deer numbers in such localized areas rebound within a few years.

“We will continue to monitor this unfortunate situation,” said Russ Mason, DNR Wildlife Division chief. “I understand how important the deer resource is to people. EHD is affecting me and my family as well because we are deer hunters. When we consider regulations for next year, there is no doubt that we will be factoring in the impact of this disease along with other influences on the deer population. Most likely, there will be changes to our management of deer in southern Michigan.”

The DNR encourages hunters to stay aware of confirmed outbreak areas and adjust, if appropriate, their hunt and harvest plans.

Anyone discovering concentrations of dead deer or those seeking more information can contact their local wildlife biologist at the nearest DNR office. Office locations can be found at www.michigan.gov/wildlife (http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTIwOTI0LjEwNzE2MTMxJ m1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDEyMDkyNC4xMDcxNjE zMSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3MTcyMTM0JmVtY WlsaWQ9cGdyYW5vd2ljekBnbWFpbC5jb20mdXNlcmlkPXBncmF ub3dpY3pAZ21haWwuY29tJmZsPSZleHRyYT1NdWx0aXZhcmlhd GVJZD0mJiY=&&&107&&&http://www.michigan.gov/wildlife?source=govdelivery) under Wildlife Offices.

Because dead deer do not harbor EHD and cannot infect other deer, it’s fine to leave carcasses where they are found. It’s also fine to bury dead deer at a sufficient depth so that no parts are showing above ground. Finally, carcasses will be accepted at landfills that accept household solid waste.

Gas Man
09-26-2012, 10:49 AM
This is just crazy.

Is it better to kill more to thin the heard even more... but problem is, you probably don't want to eat the meat...

tough spot.

Hawgrider
09-26-2012, 01:39 PM
We lost over 200 deer 2 years ago in Livingston and Oakland. This is not new. I belive 1955 was a big loss year and a couple times in the 70's The healthy deer that survive will not be affected. I plan on filling my freezer as I do every year. The crap meat you buy at the store is more likely to have health issues than venison you harvest and put on the table yourself.

Hawgrider
09-26-2012, 01:45 PM
Yeah I know what you mean about the smell,, and what's a shame the coyotes and fox won't even eat them

The yotes and the turkey buzzards and the raven will eat them. Right now its a dinner rich environment for them it will take a while. All is not lost this will have less affect than the stupid DNR 5 permits a day rule last year and the reckless issuing of doe permits in the tip of the mitt when the Big scarey WAY over rated TB scare got started in old unit 452 years ago.

Mudpuppy
09-26-2012, 02:23 PM
They need to be killed off to make the herd healthier period. Way overpopulated right now.

Hawgrider
09-26-2012, 02:48 PM
Agree. Looks like Ionia county got hit the worst so far I think it was around 4200 deer counted. The will be more added to the counted when the combines run the corn. I hunt Moncalm so far the estimate there is around 172 deer thats not even a drop in the bucket. The doom and gloom and the I wont eat the deer this year is unwarranted. EHD does not affect humans or we would all be hanging out by the water trying to cool our fevers and all our tongues would be blue.:panic::yes:

Gas Man
09-26-2012, 03:08 PM
I wasn't saying one way or the other. I don't hunt... I just find it troublesome to hear about these issues.

junkyardjon
09-26-2012, 08:42 PM
so it's ok to kill poor animals to keep the population in control?

Chain
09-27-2012, 11:33 AM
so it's ok to kill poor animals to keep the population in control?

Um, YEAH!


Besides! Poor?!?! You ever see the damn horns those suckers can grow? Look threatening to me!!!! :lol:

Mudpuppy
09-27-2012, 12:06 PM
the liberals thought maybe they could use deer condoms or birth control but the god damn deer were too inconsistent in their usage.. the next phase was to put a liquor store on every corner of the woods but that narrowly was voted down by the corporate whores in the gop.. they wanted gun shops..

in short yes it is "ok" to "kill" (murder, butcher, slaughter - whatever PETA fucking term you want to put on it) the "poor" overpopulated deer. jesus hunted with a rambo knife so it's "ok" ;)

please use the one shot one kill method for a quick clean humane kill

Hawgrider
09-27-2012, 03:05 PM
Montcalm county just got updated to 386

Animals must die and then be cooked over an open fire. Oh but wait some of you would rather have some non English speaking butcher do your dirty work for you.
Yeah run right out and get you a steak from Kroger Yum steroids and antibiotics yum yum.

I'll Kill my own thank you. :ic:

junkyardjon
09-27-2012, 09:04 PM
why is it ok to kill some animals but having butt sex with them is not? is it ok to have butt sex with them after they are dead and still warm?

Moesride
09-27-2012, 10:30 PM
why is it ok to kill some animals but having butt sex with them is not? is it ok to have butt sex with them after they are dead and still warm?

Oh shit dude........:wtf:....is there somethin you wanna tell us!:lmao:

Chain
09-28-2012, 08:06 AM
why is it ok to kill some animals but having butt sex with them is not? is it ok to have butt sex with them after they are dead and still warm?


:runaway:

And there goes the forum.............

I don't really care what you'd prefer to allow in your spank bank, but can we just keep that shit to YOUR neighborhood?!?!?!

WOW!

Hawgrider
09-28-2012, 09:40 AM
Im now at a complete loss for words:wtf:

Mudpuppy
09-28-2012, 11:51 AM
some folks like to cut the head off a chicken and fuck it in the neck while the blood is still warm. me, personally, am not into that kind of shit.. farm yard follies are not my thing.. but to each their own..

Gas Man
09-28-2012, 06:01 PM
Im now at a complete loss for words:wtf:

You and I both

junkyardjon
09-28-2012, 10:31 PM
some folks like to cut the head off a chicken and fuck it in the neck while the blood is still warm. me, personally, am not into that kind of shit.. farm yard follies are not my thing.. but to each their own..

are you sure? i have about 20 chickens ready to kill. theres no need to cut the heads off to kill them, just grab them by the neck and spin'em around. no mess, no fuss and they stay warmer longer....
there is this one guy up the road from the junk yard that lets his goats run free. little suckers like to walk in the road.

BLUESMAN
09-30-2012, 02:57 AM
Well now I am sorry I asked

Gas Man
09-30-2012, 12:13 PM
And I was sorry to hear..

:lol: