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telecast
02-13-2012, 09:30 AM
Went to a small gun show on Saturday and spied an M-1 Carbine. Talked to the guy, went home and mulled it over, went to bed thinking screw it, woke up Sunday morning, and went back.

It's a 1943 Standard Products, one of the more rare manufacturers. They turned out 247,100 of the 6 million + made. By comparison, General Motors Inland Division made over 2.6 million. Standard accounted for about 4% of the total numbers. The only two manufacturers who made fewer were The Rock-Ola Jukebox Company (228,500) and Commercial Controls (239) I don't suppose I'll ever see one from Commercial Controls!

It came with 2 GI issue 15 shot magazines and he threw in a box of ammo. Good deal, gun is in really nice shape considering it's 69 years old.

Mad Dog
02-13-2012, 11:26 AM
Sounds like a good weekend for sure and a good score on a fine weapon!:dthumb:

Gas Man
02-13-2012, 02:09 PM
:nopicsbs:

telecast
02-16-2012, 10:34 AM
No pics yet, been busy. I did feild strip it and did some research. So far I've tracked down most of the parts. The stock, handguard, recoil block, bolt, and trigger housing are Inland. The slide is Rock-Ola. I haven't dissasembled the trigger group yet to see what's in it.
I've done some research and learned in 1943 that Inland shipped 5,000 trigger housings to Standard, and the stock and hand guard were made by the same company for both Inland and Standard. It's possible that those parts are original to the gun. Underwood barrels are common to Standard receivers for the same reason. In '43 Underwood shipped 10,000 barrels to Standard, and it's more than likely it left the factory with that barrel. Other companies shipped barrels to Standard as well, in the tens of thousands. Sounds like Standard couldn't get their operation up to speed.

This was common practice. The goal was 4-5000 carbines per month per factory. They weren't in competition with each other, each had a contract with the war department. So, if Inland needed trigger sears they'd call the war department. The war department would call around, find out who had extras and get them shipped. Some of the transferred parts might be marked with the manufactrurer, some not. If there's a part in the gun with no stampings, it was a transfer.

I know the gun was rebuilt after the war. The barrel band is post-war Type 3 and has the bayonet lug, so I'm guessing that's when the Rock-Ola slide and some of the other parts were put on. With so much on it from Inland it could be that they just put the Standard receiver/Underwood barrel into an Inland gun when it was rebuilt. Oddly, Standard Products was contracted to rebuild the M1's and prepare them for storage after WWII, the other companies went back to doing what they did before the war.

Might poke around and try to find some parts to swap out. I'm sure someone will swap me a Standard slide for the Rock-Ola, they were even less prolific than Standard.


Here are the manufacturers and how many they made:
Inland Manufacturing Division, General Motors....................................... .2,632,097 |43.0%
Winchester Repeating Arms Co................................................ ............828,059 .. |13.5%
Underwood-Elliot-Fisher Co. (Typewriter company)................................. 545,616 .. | 8.9%
Saginaw Steering Gear Div., General Motors.......................................... 517,212 .. |8.5%
National Postal Meter Co................................................ ................... 413,017 .. | 6.8%
Quality Hardware & Machine Co................................................ .......... 359,666 .. | 5.9%
International Business Machines Corp (IBM).......................................... 346,500 .. | 5.7%
Standard Products Co................................................ ....................... 247,160 .. | 4.0%
Rock-Ola Co.(Jukebox company).......................................... ............... 228,500 .. | 3.7%
Commercial Controls Company........................................... ........................249 .. | <1/4%

I gave him $600 for the gun, 2 GI issued magazines and 50 rounds of ammo. About right for the current market, but the Standard receiver ups the ante. I'd bet a nickel I could sell it for a lot more. I know of one guy with a bunch of Standard parts. He wants to build one but can't locate a receiver.